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as the averages denied washington's gravitational pull, the dow gaining 60 points, s&p climbing .5%, nasdaq advancing .20%, we know when the president or the speaker of the house comes on the tube these days, the market is going to get hammered. sell, sell, sell, sell, sell, sell. even if it is just temporary. >> sell, sell, sell. >> the only thing you need to know is the time they're going to come on. if you could just blast out of some aggressive growth stocks or sell some s&p future us when see them walk to the podium, you could probably coin money! i'm surprised the president doesn't start his talks by saying, look, look, america, i'm about to send the s&p 500 down a percent with what i say. ou how about the speaker? suffice it to say we all have to keep one eye on washington and hope they don't poke it out with their endless failure to rise above partisanship. when we started this campaign, i'm sure a lot of people said don't worry, i'm sure they'll do it. today was like the worst day yet. the two parties hate each other. they really do. they personally hate each other. but how about t
gallagher in washington, vice president and executive director of msnbc.com. that was general norman swa schwartzkopf you saw on your screen who passed away yesterday. i have a lasting memory of general schwartzkopf who served in the war in vietnam as well as leading gulf storm one. there was a woman from iowa. her name was peg mullen. she wrote a book about the death of her son, michael mullen. the name of the book was "friendly fire." norman schwartzkopf was the battalion commander. he was so approachable to peg mullen, so human in his relations with peg mullen, who sought to find out how her son was killed in vietnam. he died from friendly fire, which, you know obviously meant he was killed within the confines of his own unit by shrapnel from american weapons fired. it was so impressive to read about then a colonel later to become norm an schwartzkopf general "time" magazine's man of the year who was so human. just that clip we just showed right then compared to a lot of military officials who we see on tv. an actual human being would could say i hope i don't make a mistake. things li
to a deal in washington today. you can tell from the sell-off, investors do not like it. >> no, posting their largest decline since november 14th, in case you were wondering. although we are off the lows of the session right now. the dow was down 189 two hours into the trading session. we've come off those lows. but at this point, the dow is down 1% for the week and we are down 1% today at 13,173. nasdaq lower, as well. let's see how many percentage points we're down right now. down 1.25%. the technology sector is taking a bigger hit today. down to 3,012 on the nasdaq and the s&p 500 index is down 1% at 1428. . >> house speaker john boehner says he's still open to a offer from the democrats. >> it was a dramatic evening last night. john harwood was there. he has the latest on the on talks. are there any talks, john? >> i think so. but they're pretty muted. this bill was not win of those weeks that makes washington look good. come to think of it, there aren't many weeks that make washington look good. but this was especially especially difficult because you had negotiations getting close
on stock holders they are facing something like the debt ceiling debacle. if the armed camps in washington don't disarm and agree to talk to each other in a serious way, and not just the bluster sessions that seem to be happening daily these days, which reminds me, do you remember -- do you remember the debt ceiling nightmare last year? going to those horrendous talks last summer, everybody felt very confident that the president and congress weren't really at loggerheads. market was almost at its high. pretty good, vix low. then like now, we heard that the discord was only political posturing. the stock market forwarded ahead, and the complacency was thick and more people worried about missing a move up rather than talks break down and we might actually default. every time we heard meetings between the president and the speaker like tonight, we figured we would hear mission accomplished the very next day. but we didn't. things got rancorous. ugly stalemate. the market dropped. we got a deal, but only after, not before, we had that hideous sell-off. makes sense. remember how unruly congress
. it was a couple of days' ride from monticello to washington. he stopped at an inn and falls into a conversation with a fellow guest and they have a lovely, wide ranging discussion the next morning the other guest mr. jefferson is up and out and the other guest had never called his name and he said to the inn keeper who was that and he said who did you think it was? for a while and you knew so much about medicine i thought he was a doctor. then we talked about theology and he seemed as though he might be a priest though a shaky one. i thought he could have been certainly a farmer because of everything he knew and he said i thought you knew mr. jefferson. he was a master of so many different worlds and he was indefinitely curious at the time when human curiosity and the ability to lead us to our own destiny to fulfil in many ways our greatest potentials to discover, to explore was new in the world and this was the enlightened era. they had been a day before yesterday. for the first time ever, priestley and princely authority was in the dhaka, and jefferson was there to reap the harvest of the shi
if taxes go up in 2013. host: flags all around washington, d.c. are at half staff this morning like the one you are feeling on the capital. good morning and welcome to "washington journal." for the first hour we will be talking about the aftermath of the shooting of in newtown, conn that happened yesterday. we will talk about the actions of the teachers. we will get into discussion about gun-control. that always seems to come up after situations like this. we would like for you to get involved in the conversation. the numbers are on the screen. we want to hear from teachers and people who work in the classrooms, principals and vice principals, people connected with education to find your thoughts on what happened yesterday. the actions of the teachers. how safe are in america's schools and america's schoolchildren. this is how the story is being played this morning on the front page of the "new york daily news." this is the way it is being reported this morning in "the wall street journal." the president talked about the shootings at the elementary school calling it a hate crime and vowing
fire from political opponents in washington today said enough. susan rice, the ambassador to the u.n., so embattled over the tragedy in benghazi, said she will not go through a bruising nomination fight to succeed hillary clinton as secretary of state. so, what happened behind closed doors? why now? and whom will the president pick to represent america on the world stage? abc's senior white house correspondent jake tapper has all the details right now. jake? >> reporter: good evening, diane. well, ambassador susan rice withdrew her name from consideration to be secretary of state after weeks of bruising political battles and a cacophony of criticism. in a letter to the president today, u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice wrote, "the position of secretary of state should never be politicized. i am saddened that we have reached this point even before you have decided whom to nominate." and she shared the news on nbc. >> i didn't want to see a confirmation process that was very prolonged, very politicized, very distracting and very disruptive, because there are so many th
all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last night adding to her amazing list of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennessee and think that understanding jeffson in his regional context as well as his national context and his political context is hugely important. he was a master of politics whether it was idealogically driven or geographically driven, and i think there's something resonant about a ferociously-divided atmosphere, big issues at stake and a president who's tall, cool, cerebral, pretty good at politics but doesn't like to admit it having to govern in a frack white house atmosphere. there is something that seems familiar ab
there seems to be progress still no fiscal cliff deal in washington. house speaker john boehner said he has a backup plan. but that's not enough for one in three americans who according to a new survey are cutting back on spending due to fears of going over that cliff. nbc's tracie potts joins us now with more. good morning. >> reporter: mara, good morning. good morning, everyone. there is brand new evidence in that survey that americans are really feeling the squeeze before we've even gone over the cliff, plus republicans are changing their strategy. republicans are planning a vote as early as tomorrow to keep taxes low for everyone making up $1 million. >> going to have to go to plan "b." because we want to make sure we do not go off the cliff. >> everyone should understand boehner's proposal will not pass the senate. >> reporter: president obama offered a lower threshold, 400,000. >> the president has come halfway. he hopes that the republicans will do the same. >> reporter: republicans see this million dollar vote as a last-ditchest to save business o ditch effort to save business owner
of drama in washington. congressional leaders have arrived at white house. they arrived there about an hour ago with three days to go before we go over that proverbial fiscal cliff. they are meeting with the president and the treasury secretary timothy geithner, and they are trying to hash out a deal. but reports that the president has nothing new on the table has ended up spooking wall street in a big way just in the last hour, and as bill said we finished down near the lows of the day, down about 157 points for the dow. settling up right now. down what, about 165 at the very low, bill? >> i think so, yes. >> and the nasdaq finishing down 25 points and the s&p off by 15, a fifth straight day in the red. well, it is the last friday of 2012. it's in the books. check. still no deal in sight and no new offer either on the table from the president as eamon javers told us a little while ago. what now for the markets? we have our guests and our very own rick sell sebak with us. rick, let me get to you, first of all, because you're here on the set. what now for the markets? >> what now for the mar
? as with anything related to washington, there's no easy answer to why we didn't crash today. let me walk you through three different scenarios. gigantic sell-off is right around the corner. we'll get hit hard. it just hasn't happened yet. i got tons of e-mails last night from different theorists. it's just a matter of time. 11%. 15%. people say you ain't seen nothing yet. anything is possible. i wouldn't count on a sell-off. we deserve to sell-off 7% immediately upon initial failure of t.a.r.p. legislation because it was teetering on the abyss. atms that might not work because of hefty cash withdrawals. there's always a way to avoid a catastrophe which brings me to the second reason why we didn't collapse. with the debt ceiling deal we got last year, never forget politicians can always agree on something. something small. without any violation of principles. the politician that took no increase tax pledge governor norquist can't vote for one. don't ask him to. he can't vote for one even if the speaker of the house tried for a tax increase. memo to washington who people think there can be a d
in this morning's baltimore sun reflects those across the country. from the tribune's washington magazine, it's said when he weight in friday he delivered a lashing speech that included violent movies and video games as he said his plan would train those to guard our schools. in this edition of today's program, we're going to begin the first 45 minutes of the program to talk about the nra's response to the shootings. they broke their silence yesterday with executive director and vice president wayne. we'll talk more about what he had to say. but we want to get you involved in the conversation. so the numbers on your screen. guest: we also have a special line this morning for members of the n.r.a. (202)585-3883 this is for n.r.a. members. you can also reach out to us at twitter.com/cspanwj and f.s.a. -- and facebook at and the headline face of the n.r.a. mountains a forceful defense advocate of armed school guards excels at lighting fires under supporters and critics alike. guest: we'll get back to more of the newspaper articles this morning regarding the n.r.a.'s response to the newtown shoot
leaders in washington. good morning. not an easy night for speaker john boehner. >> yes, he is coming off as having a very difficult day. he was hoping that his fellow republicans would rally around his across-the-board tax hikes that come with a fiscal cliff great he was asking fiscal conservatives to swallow some tax hikes. only on those that make more than a million dollars per year for some, that was a bridge too far. >> he is my speaker and i support him strongly. he is in a very difficult position. but i just happen to disagree with this in the correct message. raising taxes on any american, to me is not the right message at all. it is cutting spending. >> the speaker points out that the house has passed a measure that will stop all the tax hikes next year. as he said, it is all in the hands of the senate. bill: will we hear from the president? swivels democratic governments do in response? >> and i think the short answer is probably not much. at least not in the immediate offering here. the senate is in session today, but there's nothing more until later next week. as for the presi
manchin has argued everything should be on the table and has a piece in "the washington post." he says "if you think the problem of mass violence in our country is just about gun, you're wrong. if you think it's just about an entertain industries that markets to kids you're wrong. if you think it's just about insufficient security or the lack of mental health services for troubled young people and adults you're wrong. we need to address all of them" is he right? >> well, i think you need a broader debate. part of that debate that i'm focused on is safety in the schools but absolutely. you have a mental health issue and component to this. i would make the point when it comes to more restrictions on firearms in our society, that if we go down that path, we're going to miss the focal point of providing safety. i think that is really the wrong debate to have. we've had an assault weapon ban previous in our history. you have school violence continued. it's not restricted to weapons that you think of timothy mcveigh, he used fertilizer to conduct his mayhem. so i would rather focus on the safety
there in washington as we wait for the white puff of smoke to come out of the white house, eamon. >> reporter: kind of what feels like here, bill. a lot of energy at the white house, a lot of curiosity surrounding this meeting. what you can't see from here and what i can't show you, unfortunately, is just about 50 yards from here is where you saw speaker boehner walking into the building, and we've got a whole cadre of white house still press photographers up on ladders peering over the hedge trying to get a picture of the leaders as they walk in and just to the left of that crowd is another crowd of reporters all gathered around the stakeout cameras. that's where the leaders could come out and talk to microphones if they wanted to say anything after this meeting. there's a lot of anticipation of whether they will say anything after this meeting, and it's widely seen that this would be a good sign for negotiations if they do come out and talk. a lot of previous white house meetings, they have not come out to say anything afterwards, so all those folks waiting over there might be waiting in vain her
in washington. at this hour, congressional leaders are working to find common ground desperate for some sort of compromise, my sources tell me this morning the odds of a deal are still no better than 50/50. the senate will convene today at 1:00 p.m., the house back in at 2:00 p.m. stock measures around the world are on edge. the dow down five days in a row falling nearly 160 points friday and early indications are those losses could be much worse if there is no deal. consumers are jittery too. their confidence in the economy plunging for the second straight month falling to its lowest level since august. that's where we begin. let's get the latest from two top senate leaders joining us now senator chuck schumer of new york, senator jon kyl of arizona. so, gentlemen, do we have a deal? >> well, there are certainly no breakthroughs yet between senator mcconnell and senator reid, but there's a real possibility of a deal. i've been a legislator for 37 years and i've watched how these things work on these big, big agreements they almost always happen at the last minute. neither side likes to give
boehner's $800 billion tax hike will destroy american jobs and allow politicians in washington to spend even more. disagreements among republicans and democrats here on capitol hill is nothing new, but tuesday a republican aide told us the two sides aren't even talking. not surprisingly the white house disagrees. >> i can guarantee you conversations continue at different levels. and among different groups. >> reporter: both parties are ready to play the blame game in case negotiations fail. >> there's only one person out of 370 million americans who can sign something into law and that's the president. >> 60% of americans are asking the wealthy to pay more. >> reporter: a "the washington post" poll say 53% of americans will blame republicans and 29% would hold the president responsible if the nation goes over the fiscal cliff. the two sides appear close to an agreement on little things. it could lead to higher airline ticket prices and no more mail delivery on saturday. >> oh, boy. susan mcginnis in washington this morning. susan, thank you so much. one of the tax breaks due to expire n
distinguished career in congress advocating on behalf of those voices who were often drowned out in washington by the influence of the moneyed interest. over the last 40 years, congressman stark has been one of the foremost advocates on behalf on efforts to ensure that americans were able to access quality, affordable health insurance. i am honored to have been one of the three principaled co- authors in the house of the historic affordable care act which will provide quality insurance for every single american. the key role mr. stark in drafting that law and made sure that the law provided needed relief for working families. this was a crucial accomplishment, yet it was far from mr. stark's only accomplishment in the field of health care. as a former chair and ranking democrat on the ways and means health subcommittee for many years, he was a leader on the health care reform. he was a lead author of the original cobra insurance bill which ensured that workers faced with losing their jobs would not also immediately lose access to the needed health insurance. and those of us who have gone throu
service in the american revolution. he was a general of engineers under george washington and his many of you know, he designed the fortifications at west point. his payment was very long delayed and he finally got it in 1795 your in philadelphia he watches his good friend jefferson, and said would you write a will with me? and he may jefferson the executor. and after they drafted the formal, before they drafted a formal document, he had written something out in his own hand, and i would like to read this to you in conclusion. i bade mr. jefferson that in case i should die without will he should buy out of my money many negroes and free them. that remaining sons should be sufficient to give them education and provide for their means. that is to say, each should know beforehand the duty of a citizen in the free government, that he must defend his country against foreign as well as internal enemies, to have good and human hearts, sensible to the sufferings of others. each one must be married and have 100 acres of land with instruments, cattle for tillage and not to manage and govern as w
just need to feel better. cheryl: do something. come back to washington, first and foremost. dennis: a musical about some guy singing about his real feelings. lori: we are looking at the markets. tracy: i would like to see that, but i have not. lori: i have only seen it on broadway. stalks off to a tough start. early numbers point to a tough season. tracy: a nice and shiny fiscal cliff. president obama cut his vacation short. we are tracking where it is headed next. we are expecting negotiations to continue tomorrow. there is talk now that that may not happen. time to head down to the new york stock exchange with nicole petallides. nicole: merry christmas to everybody. the vix, the fear index, has been to the upside. whether or not washington will solve the worries about the so-called fiscal cliff approaching quickly. here is a look at the dow. 13,100 even. most of the dow components are under pressure. hewlett-packard doing well and bank of america in the financial round. it really is being laid upon by the retailers. i no adam shapiro will add on to that. there is a look at some m
. i think the best way to break this political gridlock in washington is to go directly to the american people because it's we the people that can demand the politicians and congress resolve this fiscal cliff, but resolve it in a way that makes our country stronger. that's why the president's come here to metro detroit. we're the home for u.s. manufacturing. also we're the home for the american worker. we need to resolve our fiscal problems, but resolve them in a way that continues to investigation in training and educating our workers and advanced manufacturing and also providing the revenue that we need to still provide health care to our seniors and social security to those who depend on it. >> sir, let's talk about getting to the sensible center here. because as the politico poll that i referenced earlier off the top of the show indicates, 59% oppose significant cuts to defense but 75% favor across the board spending cuts. so where are you and other colleagues willing to start with those spending cuts? i mean, what are democrats willing to put on the table specifical
this in washington. as the legendary everett dirksen once said, a billion here a billion there, pretty soon you're talking real money, about you this debate isn't just about the billions here and there. for average families the payroll tax cut that started two years ago is worth around 1000 as year. those families tend to spend that cash because they need it now. republicans say this is one tax cut they hate and the last time it was going to expire, the white house launched a whole campaign about $40 a paycheck. they asked families to send in their stories about what $40 meant to them. well, you know something? $40 a still a lot of cash for the families hit hardest by the great recession. for the wealthy people sitting around the negotiating table in d.c., $40 is just another steak dinner for one. but for many people who voted them into office, it's the cost of groceries for a week of family dinners. let's not forget, they are the ones who still need an economic stimulus, not the families earning more than $250,000 a year. joining me today on a newsy day, "the huffington post" sam stein and the
, including mcclatchy service and the "washington post." he has been missing in syria since august. in all there are 15 journalists who have reported to have gone missing in syria while reporting on this conflict. so far of the 15 only eight have been freed. our richard and ghazi and john are three of them. we and they and their families feel very lucky and very happy tonight that that is the case, even as we continue to be concerned about those for whom we cannot yet say that foreign correspondents and crews know exactly how dangerous it can be to report from a war zone. we know in part from their reporting that this particular war zone appears to be descending into just total chaos right now. you can see signs of that in the syrian government's apparent decision to fire scud missiles inside its own territory at its own people. they deny they have done it. nato says they have evidence they have. you can see it in the increasing alarm in the increasing reports that the regime may at least be moving its chemical weapons stocks around the country. you can see it in richard's latest reporting
of the sheriff. >> just broken. >> washington was -- washington barely ran for a second term because he was so tired of being criticized. adams was defeated. jefferson left under a huge cloud. truman is the modern example of every president who gets in trouble wants to be truman because it means history implicates you, right? one of the things that happened was watergate. and it took 30 years, maybe a little bit less, but truman -- remember that one-man show -- >> the merle miller one? >> the plain speaking -- but there was a one-man show that went on just as watergate was breaking. and truman had the great good fortune of having disliked richard nixon early and had a lot of quotations about it. and he suddenly, as faith in the public sector is falling in the early '70s, all the examples you're talking about with truman are looking better and better. a president who, as evan wrote about the wise men, he was the popular embodiment of an american willingness to project power and to stand guard over a really complicated dark world. >> by the way, during the mid'70s, also, even chicago, the band c
't happen in washingtoners it would make great television. right-to-work laws in michigan became the 24th state in the nation. it allows union workers to opt out of paying union dues even if they're not in the union. stephen moore, "wall street journal." who would be next? >> there are a number of states neighbors to michigan really looking at this legislation. i'll name a few to you, bill. pennsylvania, ohio, west virgina, states like that are competing against southern states. remember a lot of jobs and a lot of manufacturing has moved from the midwest, the kind of rust belt of america to the south in part because those southern states are right-to-work. can i mention one other thing if i could, bill, about this issue that is important? bill: sure. >> there is so much misinformation what it means to be a right-to-work state. i want your viewers to know this, if you're a right-to-work state it does not ban unions, bill. simply means that workers who work for a unionized company have the right as an individual to join the union or not. it does not ban unions. bill: to be more specific, if
many days and nights alone as i have tried to come up here and change things in washington. she's often reminded me or questioned how i thought i could change the world, when i couldn't even mow the grass. but she has been a supporter and certainly so important, as i left my children who were still in school and i began serving in the house, kept them on the right track. and i particularly want to thank them. all of you who served here know that when we sign up for public life we also sign our families up for public life. in a lot of ways it makes their lives much more difficult. so i want to thank my children, my wife, debbie, and family for putting up with this and being such a support. i also have to thank the people of south carolina who have entrusted me with this job in the senate for the last eight years and in the house six years before that. all of you know who served for your states. as you've traveled around and met people, toured businesses and spoken to groups, it really creates a deep love and appreciation for people back home. i look at what we're making in south carolina
the department of homeland security program that gives money to recover from a terrorist incident. "washington journal," is next. [video clip] >> we cannot tolerate this any more. these tragedies must end. we must change, to end them. host: president obama at last night's interfaith prayer vigil in newtown, connecticut, speaking to the community hit by friday's elementary school shootings. it's monday, december 17, 2012. the president offered words of solidarity and state and pledged to use the power of the presidency and to prevent future killings. some are asking whether that is an indication on whether he will push for stronger gun control laws. question for you is and should u.s. gun laws change? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join the conversation on facebook, or send us an e-mail. our question for you is whether u.s. gun laws should change? here's the headline in "usa today" -- jumping down into the story, it says -- others are exploring the question of gun laws. we will hear some comments from members of congress this morning. congression
on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to some people, but i feel the good thing would be unlimited in of government at the federal level. that has nothing to do with this. that would be more on the spending cuts. host: what do you make of the back a plan being reported by the new york times saying if we cannot come to some sort of deal, we should just passed tax cuts for the middle class americans and then fight later on for spending cuts and increasing taxes for the wealthy? caller: the tax cut for the general population is great. that would be good for stimulating the economy. but the big thing is hit there needs to be a balanced plan. we need more revenue and we need less spendin
washington and colorado. [ laughter ] it does not make sense from a point of view to focus on. [coughing] >> has. >> barbara is trying to resurrect the fume gang. no online show tonight. thanks for inviting us into your home tonight. that's it for "special report." good night from washington. >> this is the fox report. tonight, we watched it take shape and take aim with you for hours on fox. the christmas day storm with a life-taking punch. and at this hour, the next round is coming. >> have done a lot of damage. people are hurt. >> harris: dozen of twisters slamming a dozen states. >> look at them. >> i have never seen one in real life. it's pretty amazing. >> harris: amazing, but very dangerous. tonight, the destruction unleashed from the sky. and the same storm system dumping snow and creating havoc for drivers. >> i don't care to go back through it. >> harris: flying isn't much of an option with hundreds of flights now cancelled. we will show you where the storm is headed next. this is a fox news weather center. i'm harris faulkner in tonight for shepard smith. we are tracking what h
journal" columnist and political diary editor jason riley and washington columnist kim strossel. dan, we would like to say for a longtime we live in a center right country. if you l look at the last two presidential elections, that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living in a new progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i am not sure about the country. i think what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward and not to cut spending, but to increase spending. it is explicit from historic 20% of gdp to 25% of gdp. rather than cut spending, raise taxes as necessary to support the spending. and i would say that is in fact the french model. the question is whether that model can produce enough growth to support jobs in the economy.en >> noen question, jason. taxes are going up. we know that. spending going up for sure even before the health care law kicks in. so we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. >> right. >> not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> what happened was the supre
falls in a barrel. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let's start with this. president obama and his republican opponents are about to go over niagra falls in a barrel, but nobody knows for shush how bad it's going to be. will the economy smash on the rocks below? will the stock market plunge a thousand points and keep on dropping? will the world money watchers see the u.s. drowning in its own dysfunction? or will obama and the dead-end opposition it faces be saved by the public's horribly low expectations of what they can do? what will prove stronger for obama and boehner? the barrels they're riding in or the power of niagra falls itself? joining me now is politico's jonathan ryan. how about an answer on that one? what's going to protect these guys more? the low expectations people have about them getting anything done or failing to do what they set out to do. they all set the deadline. they have the -- what do you call it. the stakes are clear, the payroll taxes, income taxes, you name it. they put it all together. and if they blow it, who
now, washington bureau correspondent hampton pearson. let's see what the average american will or won't be seeing in their pi check. >> reporter: i'm here for the lump of coal portion of the program. if there's no deal, let's look at what happens to tax rates in just seven days and these stats are from the tax policy center. the annual income from somebody in the $50,000 to $75,000, about a $2,400 increase. jumping ahead to $100,000 to $200,000, the average tax increase, $6,600. tacking at that great divide of the wealthy, over $250,000, at least a $11,000 tax hike. over $1 million, more than $254,000. >> hampton, looking at that number, that's for those americans working right now. there are still struggling americans, millions looking for work and what's the fiscal cliff mean for them? >> reporter: okay. we have unemployment at 7.7% last month and mainly went down because people gave up looking for work and jdropped out of th job market and out of work six months or longer. 4.8 million americans, they're the folks worried the most about unemployment benefits not extended after the f
said he was come back to washington and jumping on an airplane to review some new proposal from the president that they expected to get. the whole afternoon has been spent by reporters trying -- trying to figure out what was going on. now harry vaed responding to mcconnell so let's right to it. >> he's upset because, quote, the phone never rang. he complains i've not delivered solutions to the fiscal cliff. he's in error. we all know that in july of this year we passed in the senate the relief that would give -- that it would give to middle class americans. that -- that passed the senate. now, we know the republicans have buried themselves in procedural roadblocks in everything we're trying to do out here and now they are saying, well, we can't do the 250 because it wasn't blue slipped, because it will be blue slipped. mr. president, how does the american people retook the that? there was a bill introduced by the ranking member of the ways and means committee in the house, sandy levin, that called for this legislation. the speaker was going to bring it up to kill it, but he coul
wallace, talks to avert the fiscal cliff st washington debates how to prevent more mass murders. ♪ >> chris: with nine days to go is it possible to make a deal to head off big tax increases, and spending cuts? we'll ask two senate leaders, republican john barrasso, and, democrat, kent conrad. then, as the nation mourns the victims of the newtown school shooting, we turn to a man of faith. for some answers. in these trying times he sees the need for a spiritual awakening. we'll discuss the sandy hook massacre and the meaning of christmas. with pastor rick warren. >>> plus, a change at the state department. as the benghazi report is finally released. we'll ask our sunday panel about the nomination of john kerry to replace hillary clinton. and, where the investigation of a terror attack that killed four americans goes now. and, our power player of the week, continues in holiday tradition, to show respect for veterans. all, right now, on fox news sunday. ♪ >> chris: and hello, again from fox news in washington. at christmas, people who arnauty get coal in their stock and if the
call members of the house back to washington today. he shouldn't have let them two in fact. they're not here. they're not here. john boehner seeps to care more about keeping his speakership than about keeping the nation on firm financial footing. >> reporter: there have been all eyes on senator mitch mcconnell, the republican leader, the counterpart to harry reid because he has been pretty quiet early on in the negotiations. was defering speaker boehner to give the republican side. after hearing senator reid yesterday, senator mcconnell fired back. take a listen. >> we're coming up against a hard deadline here and i said, this is a conversation we should had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. >> reporter: now senator mcconnell also said he was disappointed because when he got a call from the president two nights ago right before the president left hawaii to come back here to the white house, senator mcconnell says that was the first time he heard from an
on the president to realize that this is a conversation that he has to have not just with washington but the rest of the country. bringing in business leaders, bringing in small business leaders, going out across the country. one reason i think why this time it's going to be different from the failures of the past, the debt ceiling debacle, the failure of the super committee, is i think the american people and particularly the american business community, realize what's at stake, and i think an awful lot of us, frankly, in both parties who are willing to get there -- i want to commend kelly as well. there's been a big group of us, well in excess of the majority in the senate who say we're willing to do our part. we want to give the speaker and the president room to get the framework, but we'll be there to fill in the details as we go forward. >> senator ayotte, there's not much time left here, and it does seem like an inordinate amount of time, almost a month has passed, and we have a description of stalemate and way far apart. >> candy, i see that as very disappointing, a big problem. that's why
." live in the nation's capital. this is exciting. and you know, i said, let's do a show from washington, d.c., because they get so much stuff done there. it's like silicon valley. and going there when steve jobs was really bringing apple to the forefront -- >> a happening place. >> it is. it's where things happen. that's why we're here, steve rattner. >> washington is the place. with us on set, economic analyst steve rattner. also political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post, sam stein. andrea mitchell. and in new york, msnbc contributor, mike barnicle. and the co-anchor of "street signs," brian sullivan. we've got a lot to talk about, mike barnicle, but i saw a headline on the front page of "usa today," a tease that is very intriguing, and that is one of the greatest players in major league baseball trying to get his worth right now. and if i were a major league team, i would pass on josh hamilton in a new york second because the guy phoned it in when his team needed him the most. there's an attitude problem. and yet he could be such a huge payoff. are the red
and politico reporters on the role of lobbyists in those negotiations. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning. both parties are reportedly still talking on the phone. as the deadline approaches, we are two weeks before christmas. eric cantor leaving open the possibility of of a post session. let's look of the numbers. the fiscal cliff deadline 22 days away. we want to begin with a look ahead at the second term agenda. in your mind, what did you think should be the number one priority. we will take your calls and comments. you can also join us on facebook and twitter. from the headlines this morning, including this from the washington post. there is also this story from "the huffington post." aspirations' including closing the educational achievement gap. the lofty goals may have to wait as lawmakers and the president toppled a number of issues that cannot wait. let's go back to the inauguration from generic 20, 2009, a few hundred feet from where we are at as he addressed the nation. he will do so again january next year. this is what he said nearly four years ago. [video
. good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington, and first it was ohio. then, indiana i understand and wisconsin. now the labor mooumt is fighting for its rights in lansing, michigan. out in the cold voicing outrage on the steps of the statehouse over right to work legislation that governor rick snyder says he will be signing when it reaches his desk likely tomorrow. joining me now nbc's ron mott live in lansing. ron, what is the latest, and how did this come to a head so quickly in michigan? >> reporter: it came together very quickly, andrea. good day to you. it's a cold day out here, but these folks are very fired up. they don't like the way that this legislation was pushed through the statehouse here. they believe that this was a republican strategy to go through a lame-duck session. they know they've got a little more democratic leaning legislature coming here next month, and they figure that this was the most opportune time to push this legislation through. a very small window of time to actually debate the issue, and then as you mention, tomorrow governor snyder is expected t
at 9:15, more about the role of social security. ♪ host: good morning. welcome to "washington journal" on this wednesday, december 12, 2012. negotiations continue over the so-called looming fiscal cliff. yesterday president obama and john boehner spoke by phone. washington post reported however that they are still working on a deal and nothing is locked down yet. we will talk more about the fiscal cliff this morning on "the washington journal." what tax deductions would you give up as part of a solution to the deficit problems? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. find a son facebook and weigh in there. at journal@c- span.org. "the christian science monitor," asked what we would be willing to give up. "americans would be willing to give up the tax deduction for charitable giving over other popular tax breaks." host: let's take a look at the results of this poll. 25% said that they would be willing to give up the charitable giving tax
the cliff. that's where senate majority leader harry reid says we're headed. can washington save us with just five days to go? >>> plus, a proposal to give guns to school principals is gaining support. we're "outfront" with an arizona sheriff who's backing that plan. >>> and the 2012 election was all about viral videos, tonight we're counting down our favorite political video of the year. let's go "outfront." >>> i'm john avalon in for erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, a stark warning from capitol hill. senate majority leader harry reid says we're all headed for fiscal disaster. >> if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed, mr. president, the house of representatives, as we speak, with four days left before the first of the year, aren't here. >> we're now told the house will finally return to work on sunday. now, that's december 30th. in other words, less than 48 hours before we go over the fiscal cliff. meanwhile, president obama cut his hawaii vacation short to return to washington today. but has he been working on a deal? "outfront" tonight, reports fro
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